About OC Go - Milestones

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Milestones

Progress from 2011 to Date
Updated quarterly


What is OC Go?
One half penny of every sales tax dollar improves Orange County freeways, the transit system, and streets and roads as part of OC Go (also known as Measure M). After voters approved OC Go by nearly 70 percent in 2006, sales tax collection began in 2011 to achieve the goals below.

OC Go Goals

Relieve Congestion

Improve Street Conditions

Expand Metrolink

Reduce cost for seniors and persons with disabilities

Synchronize Signals

Reduce transportation related air and water pollution

13
Freeway Projects

Orange County Freeways

Completed out of a total of 30 which has added approximately 49.6 freeway lane-miles to relieve congestion in Orange County.

The OC Go freeway program includes 30 project segments that will remedy traffic chokepoints and relieve congestion on Orange County freeways. Through a five-year Early Action Plan covering the years 2007 to 2012, several key OC Go freeway project segments were advanced and implemented prior to the collection of sales tax revenues.

As of March 2021:

  • Thirteen freeway segments have been completed
  • Four segements are in construction
  • Nine segments are in or nearing design
  • Four segments will be environmentally cleared by 2030

See more about OC Go Projects and Programs Schedule, as of March 2021.

595,841
Freeway Services

Orange County Motor Assets

Provided to assist motorists and remove congestion-causing debris along the Orange County freeway system.

The Freeway Service Patrol is a contracted tow-truck service that helps motorists whose vehicles have become disabled on Orange County freeways and removes congestion-causing debris from traffic lanes to reduce congestion and the possibility of secondary accidents. For the period January 2021 to March 2021, it has provided a total of 14,812 services on the Orange County freeway system.

See more about Freeway Service Patrol.

The OC Go freeway program includes 30 project segments that will remedy traffic chokepoints and relieve congestion on Orange County freeways. Through a five-year Early Action Plan covering the years 2007 to 2012, several key OC Go freeway project segments were advanced and implemented prior to the collection of sales tax revenues.

As of March 2021:

  • Thirteen freeway segments have been completed
  • Four segements are in construction
  • Nine segments are in or nearing design
  • Four segments will be environmentally cleared by 2030

See more about OC Go Projects and Programs Schedule, as of March 2021.

The Freeway Service Patrol is a contracted tow-truck service that helps motorists whose vehicles have become disabled on Orange County freeways and removes congestion-causing debris from traffic lanes to reduce congestion and the possibility of secondary accidents. For the period January 2021 to March 2021, it has provided a total of 14,812 services on the Orange County freeway system.

See more about Freeway Service Patrol.

$812.8 M
Invested in Streets

For transportation improvements through the streets and roads competitive and formula funding programs.

Every trip begins with a local street or road. Keeping them in good condition is an important component of OC Go. As of March 2021, approximately $493.8 million in Local Fair Share funds have been distributed to cities and the County to preserve existing streets and roads and provide other transportation improvements based on the priorities and infrastructure needs of local agencies. Additionally, OCTA has awarded over $319 million for 155 projects through ten competitive calls for projects to provide further improvements on Orange County's Master Plan of Arterial Highways. As a result, the Pavement Condition Index for Orange County improved from 77 in 2014 to 79 in 2018 - best in State.

See more about Street and Road Improvements.

3,003
Signals

Orange County Signals

Signals synchronized to improve traffic flow along 772 miles of Orange County roads.

Driving through multiple cities and stopping at red lights can be difficult and time consuming, in part because each city controls its own traffic signals. OC Go helps synchronize traffic lights across the county to reduce congestion and improve the quality of your drive.

As of March 2021, the program has resulted in more than $107.4 million in funding awarded by the Board to implement 89 signal projects, with an additional 28 projects planned or in progress through the Regional Traffic Signal Synchronization Program.

Travel time savings: 13%, Speed improvements: 14%, Stop reduction: 29%

See more about Signal Synchronization.

Every trip begins with a local street or road. Keeping them in good condition is an important component of OC Go. As of March 2021, approximately $493.8 million in Local Fair Share funds have been distributed to cities and the County to preserve existing streets and roads and provide other transportation improvements based on the priorities and infrastructure needs of local agencies. Additionally, OCTA has awarded over $319 million for 155 projects through ten competitive calls for projects to provide further improvements on Orange County's Master Plan of Arterial Highways. As a result, the Pavement Condition Index for Orange County improved from 77 in 2014 to 79 in 2018 - best in State.

See more about Street and Road Improvements.

Driving through multiple cities and stopping at red lights can be difficult and time consuming, in part because each city controls its own traffic signals. OC Go helps synchronize traffic lights across the county to reduce congestion and improve the quality of your drive.

As of March 2021, the program has resulted in more than $107.4 million in funding awarded by the Board to implement 89 signal projects, with an additional 28 projects planned or in progress through the Regional Traffic Signal Synchronization Program.

Travel time savings: 13%, Speed improvements: 14%, Stop reduction: 29%

See more about Signal Synchronization.

7
Bridges and Underpasses

Orange County Bridges and Underpasses

Built to safely separate cars from freight trains and relieve congestion in the cities of Anaheim, Fullerton and Placentia.

OCTA built a total of seven bridges and underpasses to separate car and pedestrian traffic from the busy Burlington Northern Santa Fe (BNSF) freight rail line running through the cities of Anaheim, Fullerton and Placentia.

By 2030, the number of daily freight trains is expected to nearly double from 70 to 130. The OC Bridges Program helps preserve quality of life by keeping motorists moving while allowing trains to transport goods.

OC Go contributed more than a fifth of the funds ($149 million) to the $667 million cost of the OC Bridges Program and leveraged the remainder by attracting local, state, and federal contributions.

Projects include: Kraemer Boulevard, Lakeview Avenue, Orangethorpe Avenue, Placentia Avenue, Raymond Avenue, State College Boulevard and Tustin Avenue/Rose Drive.

See more about OC Bridges.

6
Metrolink Station Improvements

Completed to expand Metrolink services, enhance the traveler experience and improve safe and reliable rail service in Orange County. OCTA also subsidizes Metrolink commuter rail service on three lines with 41 weekday/16 weekend trains.

Each day, commuters and other travelers use convenient Metrolink trains to get to work or other destinations within Orange County or adjoining counties including Los Angeles, Riverside, San Bernardino and San Diego. Orange County has 12 Metrolink stations and is served by three lines — Orange County Line (OC Line), Inland Empire Orange County Line (IEOC Line) and 91/Perris Valley Line.

In March 2020, all Metrolink services were impacted by the statewide enforcement of stay-at-home orders that resulted from the COVID-19 pandemic. Metrolink implemented temporary service reductions in March and November 2020 due to the decline in ridership. Once ridership recovers following the pandemic, Metrolink and OCTA will reassess the service needs in Orange County and reinstate various trains.

As of March 2021:

  • Six projects are complete
    • Fullerton Transportation Center Elevator Improvements
    • Laguna Niguel/Mission Viejo Metrolink Station ADA Ramps
    • Orange Transportation Center Metrolink Parking Structure
    • San Clemente Pier Station Lighting
    • San Juan Capistrano/Laguna Niguel Passing Siding
    • Tustin Metrolink Station Parking Structure

  • Two projects are in or nearing construction
    • Anaheim Canyon Metrolink Station Improvements
    • Placentia Metrolink Station Improvements and Parking Structure

See more about Rail Projects.

OCTA built a total of seven bridges and underpasses to separate car and pedestrian traffic from the busy Burlington Northern Santa Fe (BNSF) freight rail line running through the cities of Anaheim, Fullerton and Placentia.

By 2030, the number of daily freight trains is expected to nearly double from 70 to 130. The OC Bridges Program helps preserve quality of life by keeping motorists moving while allowing trains to transport goods.

OC Go contributed more than a fifth of the funds ($149 million) to the $667 million cost of the OC Bridges Program and leveraged the remainder by attracting local, state, and federal contributions.

Projects include: Kraemer Boulevard, Lakeview Avenue, Orangethorpe Avenue, Placentia Avenue, Raymond Avenue, State College Boulevard and Tustin Avenue/Rose Drive.

See more about OC Bridges.

Each day, commuters and other travelers use convenient Metrolink trains to get to work or other destinations within Orange County or adjoining counties including Los Angeles, Riverside, San Bernardino and San Diego. Orange County has 12 Metrolink stations and is served by three lines — Orange County Line (OC Line), Inland Empire Orange County Line (IEOC Line) and 91/Perris Valley Line.

In March 2020, all Metrolink services were impacted by the statewide enforcement of stay-at-home orders that resulted from the COVID-19 pandemic. Metrolink implemented temporary service reductions in March and November 2020 due to the decline in ridership. Once ridership recovers following the pandemic, Metrolink and OCTA will reassess the service needs in Orange County and reinstate various trains.

As of March 2021:

  • Six projects are complete
    • Fullerton Transportation Center Elevator Improvements
    • Laguna Niguel/Mission Viejo Metrolink Station ADA Ramps
    • Orange Transportation Center Metrolink Parking Structure
    • San Clemente Pier Station Lighting
    • San Juan Capistrano/Laguna Niguel Passing Siding
    • Tustin Metrolink Station Parking Structure

  • Two projects are in or nearing construction
    • Anaheim Canyon Metrolink Station Improvements
    • Placentia Metrolink Station Improvements and Parking Structure

See more about Rail Projects.

4.15
Miles

Orange County Streetcar

The OC Streetcar will travel as it connects activity, employment and transit to the Santa Ana train center.

The OC Streetcar will provide locals and commuters direct access to a key Metrolink station and will be an attractive alternative to driving in Orange County. The OC Streetcar will start at the Santa Ana Regional Transportation Center and serve Santa Ana's historic downtown and Civic Center on the 4.15-mile route to Garden Grove. It will connect directly with 18 OCTA bus routes, including the seven busiest routes in the county. In addition, the OC Streetcar is expected to support economic development and create jobs. More than half of the funding for the OC Streetcar is planned to come from the federal government with some state and local funding. A groundbreaking ceremony was held on November 30, 2018, the same day the project received sign off on the $149 million full funding grant agreement from the Federal Transit Administration. Construction is underway with service anticipated to begin in 2023.

See more about the OC Streetcar.

122 M
Boardings

Have been provided to seniors and persons with disabilities for reduced fares and specialized ACCESS services. To date, more than $35 million has been allocated to fund the Fare Stabilization Program.

Three programs work together to provide efficient, cost-effective transportation for seniors and persons with disabilities.

In addition to stabilizing fares, the Senior Mobility Program (SMP) is designed by participating cities to offer transit options that best meet the needs of the seniors in their communities in addition to local fixed-route buses and ACCESS service. OCTA and the participating cities contribute to SMP. The Senior Non-Emergency Medical Transportation (SNEMT) Program supplements existing countywide senior non-emergency medical transportation services.

As of March 2021, OC Go has provided:

  • More than $25.5 million to 32 participating cities to support over 2.47 million boardings for seniors traveling to medical appointments, nutrition programs, shopping destinations, and senior and community center activities as part of the SMP.
  • More than $27.6 million has been provided to support over 992,000 boardings as part of the SNEMT Program.

See more about Transit Programs.

The OC Streetcar will provide locals and commuters direct access to a key Metrolink station and will be an attractive alternative to driving in Orange County. The OC Streetcar will start at the Santa Ana Regional Transportation Center and serve Santa Ana's historic downtown and Civic Center on the 4.15-mile route to Garden Grove. It will connect directly with 18 OCTA bus routes, including the seven busiest routes in the county. In addition, the OC Streetcar is expected to support economic development and create jobs. More than half of the funding for the OC Streetcar is planned to come from the federal government with some state and local funding. A groundbreaking ceremony was held on November 30, 2018, the same day the project received sign off on the $149 million full funding grant agreement from the Federal Transit Administration. Construction is underway with service anticipated to begin in 2023.

See more about the OC Streetcar.

Three programs work together to provide efficient, cost-effective transportation for seniors and persons with disabilities.

In addition to stabilizing fares, the Senior Mobility Program (SMP) is designed by participating cities to offer transit options that best meet the needs of the seniors in their communities in addition to local fixed-route buses and ACCESS service. OCTA and the participating cities contribute to SMP. The Senior Non-Emergency Medical Transportation (SNEMT) Program supplements existing countywide senior non-emergency medical transportation services.

As of March 2021, OC Go has provided:

  • More than $25.5 million to 32 participating cities to support over 2.47 million boardings for seniors traveling to medical appointments, nutrition programs, shopping destinations, and senior and community center activities as part of the SMP.
  • More than $27.6 million has been provided to support over 992,000 boardings as part of the SNEMT Program.

See more about Transit Programs.

1,300
Acres

Orange County Acres

Acquired and preserved as open space in exchange for streamlined project approvals for freeway improvement projects.

The OC Go Environmental Mitigation Program (EMP) allocates funds to acquire land and restore habitat for comprehensive environmental mitigation of impacts resulting from the freeway improvement projects. These efforts ensured early and higher-value environmental benefits such as habitat protection, connectivity, and resource preservation.

To date, OCTA has acquired more than 1,300 acres in Brea, Laguna Beach, Silverado Canyon, and Trabuco Canyon and has funded 12 restoration projects across Orange County. Acquired properties are purchased and permanently preserved as open space and ensure OCTA's wilderness preserves will remain forever protected from development. Funded restoration projects restore preserved open space lands to their native habitat and include the removal of invasive plant species.

As part of the Conservation Plan requirement, an endowment has been established to pay for the long-term management of the Preserves. Current projections indicate that OCTA remains on track to meet the endowment target of $46.2 million in FY 2027-28. As of March 31, 2021, the endowment balance was $18,216,874.

See more about the Environmental Mitigation Program.

33 M
Gallons of Trash

Orange County Trash

Captured as part of a program that removes visible pollutants from roads before they reach waterways.

OC Go funds grants that help the environment. This program is composed of a two-tiered funding process focusing on early priorities (Tier 1) and a second program designed to prepare for regional, potentially multi-jurisdictional, capital-intensive projects (Tier 2). Since 2011, when this program began, $51.4 million has been awarded for 178 grants for devices that remove pollution from waterways. It is estimated that nearly 33 million gallons of trash has been captured through the Tier 1 Program since inception of the program, which is the equivalent of filling nearly 78 football fields with one-foot deep of trash. Over time, the volume of trash captured is expected to increase. In addition, it is estimated that the funded Tier 2 projects, once fully functional, will have an annual groundwater recharge potential of approximately 157 million gallons of water from infiltration or through pumped and treated recharge facilities.

See more about the Environmental Cleanup Program.

The OC Go Environmental Mitigation Program (EMP) allocates funds to acquire land and restore habitat for comprehensive environmental mitigation of impacts resulting from the freeway improvement projects. These efforts ensured early and higher-value environmental benefits such as habitat protection, connectivity, and resource preservation.

To date, OCTA has acquired more than 1,300 acres in Brea, Laguna Beach, Silverado Canyon, and Trabuco Canyon and has funded 12 restoration projects across Orange County. Acquired properties are purchased and permanently preserved as open space and ensure OCTA's wilderness preserves will remain forever protected from development. Funded restoration projects restore preserved open space lands to their native habitat and include the removal of invasive plant species.

As part of the Conservation Plan requirement, an endowment has been established to pay for the long-term management of the Preserves. Current projections indicate that OCTA remains on track to meet the endowment target of $46.2 million in FY 2027-28. As of March 31, 2021, the endowment balance was $18,216,874.

See more about the Environmental Mitigation Program.

OC Go funds grants that help the environment. This program is composed of a two-tiered funding process focusing on early priorities (Tier 1) and a second program designed to prepare for regional, potentially multi-jurisdictional, capital-intensive projects (Tier 2). Since 2011, when this program began, $51.4 million has been awarded for 178 grants for devices that remove pollution from waterways. It is estimated that nearly 33 million gallons of trash has been captured through the Tier 1 Program since inception of the program, which is the equivalent of filling nearly 78 football fields with one-foot deep of trash. Over time, the volume of trash captured is expected to increase. In addition, it is estimated that the funded Tier 2 projects, once fully functional, will have an annual groundwater recharge potential of approximately 157 million gallons of water from infiltration or through pumped and treated recharge facilities.

See more about the Environmental Cleanup Program

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