About OC Go - Milestones

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Milestones

Progress from 2011 to Date
Updated quarterly


What is OC Go?
One half penny of every sales tax dollar improves Orange County freeways, the transit system, and streets and roads as part of OC Go (also known as Measure M). After voters approved OC Go by 70 percent in 2006, sales tax collection began in 2011. Now in the tenth year of a 30-year program, OC Go continues to benefit Orange County residents every day. More Information

OC Go in recent years

In November 2019, the OCTA Board approved the 2019 update of the Next 10 Delivery Plan (Next 10 Plan) providing guidance for OC Go project and program delivery through 2026. A review and update of the Next 10 Plan is underway and is anticipated to be presented to the OCTA Board of Directors for consideration in spring 2021. The update will incorporate current revenue projections, bonding assumptions, project costs and schedules. It will also identify adjustments needed to ensure continued delivery of the complete OC Go Plan.

Rebranding

OCTA rebranded Measure M as OC Go to raise awareness about Orange County's vital local sales tax for transportation improvements. The new OC Go name and logo is consistent with other OCTA brands including OC Bus, OC Streetcar, OC Bike, OC Vanpool and OC Metrolink.

12
Freeway Projects

Orange County Freeways

Segments completed out of a total of 30 to relieve congestion in Orange County.

The OC Go freeway program includes 30 project segments that will remedy traffic chokepoints and relieve congestion on Orange County freeways. Through a five-year Early Action Plan covering the years 2007 to 2012, several key OC Go freeway segments were advanced and implemented prior to the collection of sales tax revenues. Design, environmental, and construction are stages necessary for freeway completion. Twelve freeway segments have been completed, five are in the construction phase, five are in the design phase, and the remaining eight will be environmentally cleared by 2026.

See more about OC Go Projects and Programs Schedule, as of December 2020.

7
Bridges

Orange County Bridges

Overpasses and underpasses built to safely separate cars from freight trains in the cities of Anaheim, Fullerton and Placentia.

OCTA built a total of seven bridges and underpasses to separate car and pedestrian traffic from the busy Burlington Northern Santa Fe (BNSF) freight rail line running through the cities of Anaheim, Fullerton and Placentia.

By 2030, the number of daily freight trains is expected to nearly double from 70 to 130. The OC Bridges Program helps preserve quality of life by keeping motorists moving while allowing trains to transport goods.

OC Go contributed more than a fifth of the funds ($149 million) to the $667 million cost of the OC Bridges Program and leveraged the remainder by attracting local, state, and federal contributions.

Projects include: Kraemer Boulevard, Lakeview Avenue, Orangethorpe Avenue, Placentia Avenue, Raymond Avenue, State College Boulevard and Tustin Avenue/Rose Drive.

See more about OC Bridges.

The OC Go freeway program includes 30 project segments that will remedy traffic chokepoints and relieve congestion on Orange County freeways. Through a five-year Early Action Plan covering the years 2007 to 2012, several key OC Go freeway segments were advanced and implemented prior to the collection of sales tax revenues. Design, environmental, and construction are stages necessary for freeway completion. Twelve freeway segments have been completed, five are in the construction phase, five are in the design phase, and the remaining eight will be environmentally cleared by 2026.

See more about OC Go Projects and Programs Schedule, as of December 2020.

OCTA built a total of seven bridges and underpasses to separate car and pedestrian traffic from the busy Burlington Northern Santa Fe (BNSF) freight rail line running through the cities of Anaheim, Fullerton and Placentia.

By 2030, the number of daily freight trains is expected to nearly double from 70 to 130. The OC Bridges Program helps preserve quality of life by keeping motorists moving while allowing trains to transport goods.

OC Go contributed more than a fifth of the funds ($149 million) to the $667 million cost of the OC Bridges Program and leveraged the remainder by attracting local, state, and federal contributions.

Projects include: Kraemer Boulevard, Lakeview Avenue, Orangethorpe Avenue, Placentia Avenue, Raymond Avenue, State College Boulevard and Tustin Avenue/Rose Drive.

See more about OC Bridges.

3,003
Signals

Orange County Signals

Signals synchronized to improve traffic flow along 772 miles of Orange County roads.

Driving through multiple cities stopping at red lights can be difficult and time consuming, in part because each city controls its own traffic signals. OC Go helps synchronize traffic lights across the county to improve the quality of your drive.

28 projects are planned or in progress through the Regional Traffic Signal Synchronization Program. As of December 2020, the program has resulted in: 89 signal projects implemented and more than $107.4 million in funding awarded by the Board.

Travel time savings: 13%, Speed improvements: 14%, Stop reduction: 29%

See more about Signal Synchronization.

4.15
Miles

Orange County Streetcar

Miles the OC Streetcar will travel as it connects activity, employment and transit to the Santa Ana train center.

The OC Streetcar will start at the Santa Ana Regional Transportation Center and serve Santa Ana's historic downtown and Civic Center on the 4.15-mile route to Garden Grove. It will connect directly with 18 OCTA bus routes, including the seven busiest routes in the county. In addition, the OC Streetcar is expected to support economic development and create jobs. More than half of the funding for the OC Streetcar is planned to come from the federal government with some state and local funding. A groundbreaking ceremony was held on November 30, 2018, the same day the project received sign off on the $149 million full funding grant agreement from the Federal Transit Administration. Construction is underway with service anticipated to begin in 2022. By 2035, the OC Streetcar is estimated to carry more than 7,000 riders each day.

See more about the OC Streetcar.

Driving through multiple cities stopping at red lights can be difficult and time consuming, in part because each city controls its own traffic signals. OC Go helps synchronize traffic lights across the county to improve the quality of your drive.

28 projects are planned or in progress through the Regional Traffic Signal Synchronization Program. As of December 2020, the program has resulted in: 89 signal projects implemented and more than $107.4 million in funding awarded by the Board.

Travel time savings: 13%, Speed improvements: 14%, Stop reduction: 29%

See more about Signal Synchronization.

The OC Streetcar will start at the Santa Ana Regional Transportation Center and serve Santa Ana's historic downtown and Civic Center on the 4.15-mile route to Garden Grove. It will connect directly with 18 OCTA bus routes, including the seven busiest routes in the county. In addition, the OC Streetcar is expected to support economic development and create jobs. More than half of the funding for the OC Streetcar is planned to come from the federal government with some state and local funding. A groundbreaking ceremony was held on November 30, 2018, the same day the project received sign off on the $149 million full funding grant agreement from the Federal Transit Administration. Construction is underway with service anticipated to begin in 2022. By 2035, the OC Streetcar is estimated to carry more than 7,000 riders each day.

See more about the OC Streetcar.

$794M
Streets

Distributed to preserve existing streets and roads and provide other transportation improvements.

Every trip begins with a local street or road and keeping them in good shape is an important component of OC Go. As of December 2020, approximately $475.6 million in Local Fair Share funds have been distributed to cities and the County to preserve existing streets and roads and provide other transportation improvements based on the priorities and infrastructure needs of local agencies. Additionally, OCTA has awarded over $319 million for 155 projects through ten competitive calls for projects to provide further improvements on Orange County's Master Plan of Arterial Highways.

See more about Street and Road Improvements.

$84.6M
Mobility

Allocated to expand mobility and support over 123 million boardings for special needs transportation for seniors and persons with disabilities.

Three programs work together to provide efficient, cost-effective transportation for seniors and persons with disabilities. The Senior Mobility Program (SMP) fills the gap between local fixed-route buses and ACCESS service by providing transportation services to seniors in 32 cities in Orange County. OCTA and the participating cities contribute to the program. The Senior Non-Emergency Medical Transportation (SNEMT) Program supplements existing countywide senior non-emergency medical transportation services. The Fare Stabilization Program reduces fares for bus services and ACCESS paratransit services for seniors and persons with disabilities.

As of December 2020, OC Go has provided:

More than $24.5 million to 32 participating cities to support over 2.46 million boardings for seniors traveling to medical appointments, nutrition programs, shopping destinations, and senior and community center activities as part of the SMP.

More than $26.6 million to support over 978,000 boardings as part of the SNEMT Program.

More than $33.5 million to the fare stabilization program to support over 120 million trips.

See more about Transit Programs.

Every trip begins with a local street or road and keeping them in good shape is an important component of OC Go. As of December 2020, approximately $475.6 million in Local Fair Share funds have been distributed to cities and the County to preserve existing streets and roads and provide other transportation improvements based on the priorities and infrastructure needs of local agencies. Additionally, OCTA has awarded over $319 million for 155 projects through ten competitive calls for projects to provide further improvements on Orange County's Master Plan of Arterial Highways.

See more about Street and Road Improvements.

Three programs work together to provide efficient, cost-effective transportation for seniors and persons with disabilities. The Senior Mobility Program (SMP) fills the gap between local fixed-route buses and ACCESS service by providing transportation services to seniors in 32 cities in Orange County. OCTA and the participating cities contribute to the program. The Senior Non-Emergency Medical Transportation (SNEMT) Program supplements existing countywide senior non-emergency medical transportation services. The Fare Stabilization Program reduces fares for bus services and ACCESS paratransit services for seniors and persons with disabilities.

As of December 2020, OC Go has provided:

More than $24.5 million to 32 participating cities to support over 2.46 million boardings for seniors traveling to medical appointments, nutrition programs, shopping destinations, and senior and community center activities as part of the SMP.

More than $26.6 million to support over 978,000 boardings as part of the SNEMT Program.

More than $33.5 million to the fare stabilization program to support over 120 million trips.

See more about Transit Programs.

3
Metrolink lines

Subsidizes Metrolink commuter rail service on three lines with 41 weekday/16 weekend trains.

Each day, commuters and other travelers use convenient Metrolink trains to get to work or other destinations within Orange County or adjoining counties including Los Angeles, Riverside, San Bernardino and San Diego. Orange County has 12 Metrolink stations and is served by three lines — Orange County Line (OC Line), Inland Empire Orange County Line (IEOC Line) and 91/Perris Valley Line.

Additionally, funding has been provided for rail line and station improvement projects to accommodate increased service:

As of December 2020:

  • Six projects are complete
    • Fullerton Transportation Center Elevator Improvements
    • Laguna Niguel/Mission Viejo Metrolink Station ADA Ramps
    • Orange Transportation Center Metrolink Parking Structure
    • San Clemente Pier Station Lighting
    • San Juan Capistrano/Laguna Niguel Passing Siding
    • Tustin Metrolink Station Parking Structure

  • Two projects are in the design phase
    • Anaheim Canyon Metrolink Station Improvements
    • Placentia Metrolink Station Improvements and Parking Structure

See more about Rail Projects.

1,300
Acres

Orange County Acres

Acres acquired and preserved as open space in exchange for streamlined project approvals for freeway improvement projects.

The OC Go Environmental Mitigation Program (EMP) allocates funds to acquire land and restore habitat for comprehensive environmental mitigation of impacts resulting from the freeway improvement projects. These efforts ensured early and higher-value environmental benefits such as habitat protection, connectivity, and resource preservation.

In 2017, OCTA received biological resource permits after completing a state and federal Conservation Plan for the EMP, allowing streamlined project approvals for the freeway improvement projects. Furthermore, in January 2018, OCTA secured programmatic permits and assurances for federal and state clean water permitting requirements. This is the first ever Corps-approved advanced mitigation permit for multiple mitigation sites and projects spanning numerous watersheds. Receipt of these permits represent the culmination of years of collaboration and support by the Board, environmental community, and regulatory agencies. As a result, the environmental process will be streamlined, allowing OCTA to move forward with the OC Go freeway improvement projects with mitigation requirements already in place.

To date, OCTA has acquired more than 1,300 acres in Brea, Laguna Beach, Silverado Canyon, and Trabuco Canyon and has funded 12 restoration projects across Orange County. Acquired properties are purchased and permanently preserved as open space and ensure OCTA's wilderness preserves will remain forever protected from development. Funded restoration projects restore preserved open space lands to their native habitat and include the removal of invasive plant species.

See more about the Environmental Mitigation Program.

Each day, commuters and other travelers use convenient Metrolink trains to get to work or other destinations within Orange County or adjoining counties including Los Angeles, Riverside, San Bernardino and San Diego. Orange County has 12 Metrolink stations and is served by three lines — Orange County Line (OC Line), Inland Empire Orange County Line (IEOC Line) and 91/Perris Valley Line.

Additionally, funding has been provided for rail line and station improvement projects to accommodate increased service:

As of December 2020:

  • Six projects are complete
    • Fullerton Transportation Center Elevator Improvements
    • Laguna Niguel/Mission Viejo Metrolink Station ADA Ramps
    • Orange Transportation Center Metrolink Parking Structure
    • San Clemente Pier Station Lighting
    • San Juan Capistrano/Laguna Niguel Passing Siding
    • Tustin Metrolink Station Parking Structure

  • Two projects are in the design phase
    • Anaheim Canyon Metrolink Station Improvements
    • Placentia Metrolink Station Improvements and Parking Structure

See more about Rail Projects.

The OC Go Environmental Mitigation Program (EMP) allocates funds to acquire land and restore habitat for comprehensive environmental mitigation of impacts resulting from the freeway improvement projects. These efforts ensured early and higher-value environmental benefits such as habitat protection, connectivity, and resource preservation.

In 2017, OCTA received biological resource permits after completing a state and federal Conservation Plan for the EMP, allowing streamlined project approvals for the freeway improvement projects. Furthermore, in January 2018, OCTA secured programmatic permits and assurances for federal and state clean water permitting requirements. This is the first ever Corps-approved advanced mitigation permit for multiple mitigation sites and projects spanning numerous watersheds. Receipt of these permits represent the culmination of years of collaboration and support by the Board, environmental community, and regulatory agencies. As a result, the environmental process will be streamlined, allowing OCTA to move forward with the OC Go freeway improvement projects with mitigation requirements already in place.

To date, OCTA has acquired more than 1,300 acres in Brea, Laguna Beach, Silverado Canyon, and Trabuco Canyon and has funded 12 restoration projects across Orange County. Acquired properties are purchased and permanently preserved as open space and ensure OCTA's wilderness preserves will remain forever protected from development. Funded restoration projects restore preserved open space lands to their native habitat and include the removal of invasive plant species.

See more about the Environmental Mitigation Program.

33 Million Gallons
of Trash

Orange County Trash

Amount of trash captured as part of a program that removes visible pollutants from roads before they reach waterways.

OC Go funds grants that help the environment. Since 2011, when this program began, $51.89 million has been awarded for 199 grants for devices that remove pollution from waterways. It is estimated that nearly 33 million gallons of trash has been captured since inception of the program, which is the equivalent of filling nearly 78 football fields with one-foot deep of trash. Over time, the volume of trash captured is expected to increase.

See more about the Environmental Cleanup Program.

581,029
Motorists Helped

Orange County Motor Assets

Number of assists to motorists on the Orange County freeway system.

The Freeway Service Patrol is a contracted tow-truck service that helps stranded motorists and quickly clears immobilized vehicles out of freeway lanes to minimize congestion. For the period October 2020 to December 2020, it has provided a total of 12,752 assists to motorists on the Orange County freeway system.

See more about Freeway Service Patrol.

OC Go funds grants that help the environment. Since 2011, when this program began, $51.89 million has been awarded for 199 grants for devices that remove pollution from waterways. It is estimated that nearly 33 million gallons of trash has been captured since inception of the program, which is the equivalent of filling nearly 78 football fields with one-foot deep of trash. Over time, the volume of trash captured is expected to increase.

See more about the Environmental Cleanup Program

The Freeway Service Patrol is a contracted tow-truck service that helps stranded motorists and quickly clears immobilized vehicles out of freeway lanes to minimize congestion. For the period October 2020 to December 2020, it has provided a total of 12,752 assists to motorists on the Orange County freeway system.

See more about Freeway Service Patrol.

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