Measure M Funding Programs

OCTA administers a variety of Measure M funding programs for cities to widen streets, improve intersections, coordinate signals, build Smart Streets and rehabilitate pavement. OCTA also administers regional streets and roads improvement projects. In order for cities to participate in these programs, cities are required to meet specific requirements to receive the funds to be deemed eligible. Learn more.    

Comprehensive Transportation Funding Program The Comprehensive Transportation Funding Programs (CTFP) represents a collection of competitive grant programs offered to local agencies to assist in funding street improvements, transit expansion, and even environmental mitigation projects. The CTFP was created to provide a common set of guidelines and project selection criteria for a variety of funding programs, establishing a simplified and consistent process. Each program has a specific objective, funding source and set of selection criteria detailed in separate chapters contained within these guidelines. Learn more.

  • Regional Capacity Program (Project O) The Regional Capacity Program (RCP) is a competitive program that will provide more than $1 billion over a thirty year period. The RCP replaces the Measure M Local and Regional streets and roads competitive programs. The RCP focuses on improvements to the Master Plan of Arterial Highways (MPAH). The MPAH serves as the backbone of Orange County’s arterial street network. Also included under the RCP is the Regional Grade Separation Program (RGSP), which is meant to address vehicle delays and safety issues related to at-grade rail crossings. Learn more.
  • Regional Traffic Signal Synchronization Program (Project P) OCTA, the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans), the County of Orange and all 34 cities are working together to coordinate traffic lights across the county in an effort to ease growing traffic demands. OCTA’s goal is to improve the flow of traffic in your community by developing and implementing traffic light coordination across city boundaries. These projects include optimizing signal timing to provide drivers better travel experience through reduced travel times, reduced stops and reduced delays. Learn more.
  • Local Fair Share Program (Project Q) The Local Fair Share Program provides flexible funding to help cities and the County of Orange pay for the escalating cost of restoring the aging street system. In addition, cities can use these funds for other local transportation needs such as residential street projects, traffic and pedestrian safety near schools, signal priority for emergency vehicles, etc. This program is intended to augment, rather than replace, existing transportation expenditures.  Learn more.
  • Environmental Cleanup Program (Project X) The Environmental Cleanup Program helps improve overall water quality in Orange County from transportation-generated pollution. The funds are designed to supplement, not supplant, existing transportation-related water quality programs. Eligible applicants include Orange County city and county agencies such as planning departments, public works agencies, recreational departments, etc. Third parties cannot act as the lead agency for a proposed project; however, these agencies can jointly apply with a city and/or the County of Orange. Learn more.
  • Transit Extensions to Metrolink (Project S) Orange County’s Metrolink service is increasing in frequency and it is essential that passengers have a way to get to their final destination after getting off a train. The Transit Extensions to Metrolink program provides funding to connect people between a Metrolink station and activity and employment centers throughout the county. Two types of projects are being funded through Project S – fixed-guideways and bus and station vans.  Learn more.
  • Metrolink Gateways (Project T) This program aims to convert Metrolink stations to regional gateways that connect Orange County with planned future high-speed rail systems, and deliver improvements that are necessary to connect planned future high-speed rail systems to stations on the Orange County Metrolink route. Learn more.
  • Community Based Transit/Circulators (Project V) This program establishes a competitive program for local jurisdictions to develop local bus transit services such as community based circulators, shuttles and bus trolleys that complement regional bus and rail services, and meet needs in areas not adequately served by regional transit.
  • Safe Transit Stops (Project W) This program provides for passenger amenities at 100 busiest transit stops across the County. The stops will be designed to ease transfer between bus lines and provide passenger amenities such as improved shelters, lighting, current information on bus and train timetables and arrival times, and transit ticket vending machines. OCTA is currently working on guidelines for this program and plans to go to the Board in early 2014.